Saturday, September 13, 2008

Vitamin B12 brain shrinkage

Fingolimod
Forecast Insight - Multiple Sclerosis - www.companiesandmarkets ...
PR-Inside.com (Pressemitteilung) - Wien,Austria
Datamonitor remains highly positive on Novartis┬┤s FTY720 (fingolimod).
 FTY720 is expected to achieve the greatest sales of all current late-stage pipeline ...


Fampridine
Market Report -- In Play (WIRES)
MSN Money - USA
On The Wires Acorda Therapeutics (ACOR) announces that data from its recently-completed Fampridine-SR Phase 3 trial will be presented during a poster ...
http://news.moneycentral.msn.com/provider/providerarticle.aspx?

feed=BCOM&date=20080912&id=9135146
Acorda Therapeutics To Present Phase 3 Fampridine-SR Data at World ...
Centre Daily Times - Centre,PA,USA
The poster, "Sustained-Release Fampridine Consistently Improves Walking Speed And Leg Strength In Multiple Sclerosis: A Phase 3 Trial," will be presented by ...
http://www.centredaily.com/business/technology/story/835521.html
Acorda Therapeutics To Present Phase 3 Fampridine-SR Data at World ...

MarketWatch - USA
today announced that data from its recently-completed Fampridine-SR Phase 3 trial (MS-F204) will be presented during a poster session at the World Congress ...
http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/acorda-therapeutics-present-phase-3/story.aspx?guid=%7B8AB6E8BE-E968-43FF-AE47-175F51B55D70%7D&dist=hppr
New mechanism behind autoimmunity development found

Smash Hits - India
The researchers observed that mice lacking furin in these cells developed systemic autoimmune disease, suggesting that the immune systems of the mice ...
http://news.smashits.com/283284/New-mechanism-behind-autoimmunity-development-found.htm

 

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A research study for patients with symptoms of overactive bladder due to spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis
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A research study for patients with symptoms of overactive bladder
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A research study for patients with symptoms of overactive bladder due to spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis
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A research study for patients with symptoms of overactive bladder.
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A research study for patients with symptoms of overactive bladder
Bradenton, FL

Melbourne, FL

A research study for patients with symptoms of overactive bladder due to spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis
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Vitamin B12 brain shrinkage


Vitamin B12 may help protect brain in elderly
Canada.com - Don Mills,Ontario,Canada
People who had higher vitamin B12 levels were six times less likely to experience brain shrinkage compared with those who had lower levels, according to a ...
http://www.canada.com/edmontonjournal/news/story.html?id=841f6b59-1c61-4949-9602-c59466e6e294

Key vitamin can protect ageing
Londra Gazete - London,UK
The study showed that those with lower vitamin B12 levels in their blood were six times more likely to experience brain shrinkage compared with those who ...
http://www.londragazete.com/haber_detay.asp?haberID=1945

Going veggie shrinks the brain
Courier Mail - Australia
... were retested five years later the medics found those with the lowest levels of vitamin B12 were also the most likely to have brain shrinkage. ...
http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,24336544-23272,00.html


FDA Cites Brain Virus With Rituxan

http://www.therapeuticsdaily.com/news/article.cfm?contentValue=1836409&contentType=sentryarticle&channelID=33

Associated Press DataStream FFF - Sep. 11, 2008
WASHINGTON_Federal regulators said Thursday one case of a deadly brain infection has been reported in a patient taking Genentech and Biogen Idec's blockbuster arthritis and cancer drug Rituxan.

The Food and Drug Administration said the woman died of the rare viral infection more than a year and a half after discontinuing the drug. Genentech and Biogen Idec comarket the drug in the U.S.

Cases of the infection have previously been reported in patients taking Rituxan for unapproved uses, including lupus. But FDA said the latest case is the first reported in a patient taking the drug for arthritis. The drug is also approved for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

A company spokeswoman for Genentech noted the drug's label already mentions risks of the infection.
"The patient had a number of confounding factors that make it difficult to assess the potential role, if any, that Rituxan exposure may have played," said Tara Cooper. Genentech first disclosed the death during its July earnings call, Cooper added.

According to the posting on FDA's Web site, the patient was undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatment for cancer in the months before she developed the infection.
FDA said doctors should immediately stop using Rituxan in patients who develop the infection, called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or PML. The agency noted there are no known treatments for PML.

South San Francisco-based Genentech sent a letter to doctors about the case earlier this month.

Rituxan is Genentech's second-best selling drug with $2.28 billion in sales last year, just behind the cancer therapy Avastin. Cambridge, Mass.-based Biogen claimed $617 million from those sales in 2007.

Reports of PML with Biogen Idec's multiple sclerosis drug Tysabri have weighed on company shares in recent months. In July the company reported two new cases of the disease in European patients. The drug was pulled from the market in 2005 after being linked to the rare brain disease but was reintroduced under restricted sales conditions in mid-2006.

Shares of Genentech Inc. rose $1.41, or 1.5 percent, to $97.1 Thursday. Shares of Biogen Idec Inc. gained $1.17, or 2.5 percent, to $48.47.Of Rituxan
http://www.therapeuticsdaily.com/news/article.cfm?contentValue=1836409&contentType=sentryarticle&channelID=33


Big Pharma Set for Costly Shopping Spree
http://www.therapeuticsdaily.com/news/article.cfm?contentValue=1835542&contentType=sentryarticle&channelID=33

Reuters Health - Sep. 11, 2008
By Ben Hirschler, European Pharmaceuticals Correspondent

LONDON (Reuters) - The existing drugs aren't working, so big pharmaceutical companies are set to step up the hunt for assets to buy in promising fields like biotechnology, as well as non-prescription areas of healthcare.

The risk is they could end up overpaying.
Screening for acquisitions will be high on the "to do" list of newly appointed Sanofi-Aventis Chief Executive Chris Viehbacher, when he takes the helm at the French drugmaker on Dec. 1, industry analysts and bankers say.

He is not alone. GlaxoSmithKline -- the company Viehbacher is leaving -- is also expected to strike one or more significant deals to boost its consumer health business as part of a new growth strategy.
Roche and Bristol-Myers Squibb, meanwhile, are locked in multibillion-dollar battles for two prime biotech assets, Genentech and ImClone Systems.
News this week of a second bid for ImClone, topping an earlier offer from Bristol, suggests competition is fierce.

The identity of the new bidder is unknown but analysts said ImClone could attract the likes of Pfizer, Novartis, Glaxo and Sanofi -- but it might be too big a bite for Merck KGaA, its partner on cancer drug Erbitux.
"I think it's the natural way of things that Big Pharma is going to take over the biotech world sooner or later," Carl Icahn, ImClone's billionaire chairman, told the company's annual shareholder meeting on Wednesday.
Japanese companies, too, are flexing their muscles on the global scene, with Takeda splashing out for U.S. biotech firm Millennium earlier this year and Daiichi Sankyo buying India's Ranbaxy.
SHAKING UP SANOFI

"The large guys worldwide are looking really aggressively for assets wherever they can find them, and diversification is a strong theme," said one banker, speaking on condition of anonymity.

The ousting of Gerard Le Fur as Sanofi's CEO after less than two years in the job and the appointment of an outsider signals radical change inside a group that has suffered worse than most from an inability to get enough new drugs to market.
With shareholders demanding action, dealmaking is an obvious way forward.
"We see this option as a practicable way to shake things up quickly," said Morgan Stanley analyst Andrew Baum.

Just what Viehbacher might decide to buy is less clear. A brief statement from Sanofi announcing his appointment on Wednesday highlighted overhauling drug research, growth in emerging markets and diversification as key priorities.

The last two both imply acquisitions, according to Amit Roy and colleagues at Citigroup.

French financial daily Les Echos reported that Sanofi was planning to diversify even more widely than most of its peers into health foods, vitamins and mineral supplements.

And Deutsche Bank analyst Michael Leuchten thinks a mega-merger could also be back on the cards for Sanofi, with its powerful chairman, Jean-Francois Dehecq, likely open to the idea.

Sanofi has long been tipped as a buyer for its U.S. partner Bristol-Myers, which has a market value of around $43 billion.
RISK FOR INVESTORS

The risk for investors in all these cases is that drug company executives, desperate to reinvigorate anaemic sales, may end up overpaying.

Roche stock has been capped in the last two months by worries it will have to offer substantially more than $44 billion for the rest of Genentech, while Bristol-Myers fell on Wednesday on fears of a costly bidding war for ImClone.

In the case of Sanofi, Citi's Roy said likely competition for assets with other pharmaceutical or consumer companies clearly raised the risk of overpayment.

So far, though, the biggest player in the pharmaceutical industry has been surprisingly quiet. Pfizer's failure to buy another big rival has surprised many, given its need to find new products to offset the 2011 loss of U.S. patent on its $13 billion-a-year blockbuster Lipitor.

The combination of growing generic competition, major research problems for particular drugs, and fears of a tougher U.S. regulatory and political climate mean drug stocks have been a poor investment overall this year.

Yet since June, the American Stock Exchange's pharmaceutical index, which includes leading U.S. and European companies, has outperformed the broader market by some 13 percent as fears for the global economy have fuelled demand for defensive stocks.
(Additional reporting by Lewis Krauskopf in New York; Editing by Erica Billingham)
http://www.therapeuticsdaily.com/news/article.cfm?contentValue=1835542&contentType=sentryarticle&channelID=33


Study: Retail Stores With Pharmacies Have $2.4 Trillion Impact on Economy
According to a new study, the total economic impact of retail stores with pharmacies have a total annual economic impact of $2.42 trillion, based on 2007 data - approximately 17 percent of the gross domestic product. The report also said the 39,000 chain pharmacies across the country dispensed more than 2.5 billion prescriptions in 2007, about 72 percent of the total filled in the U.S. Overall, the retail prescription market reached nearly $260 billion in 2007.
http://pharmalive.com/news/index.cfm?articleID=570701&categoryid=9&newsletter=1




Discovery Of Protein That Regulates Gene Critical To Dopamine-Releasing Brain Cells

Researchers have identified a protein they say appears to be a primary player in maintaining normal functioning of an important class of neurons - those brain cells that produce, excrete and then reabsorb dopamine neurotransmitters.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/121161.php

The Human Brain Relies On Old And New Mechanisms For Diminishing Fear
A new study suggests that although humans may have developed complex thought processes that can help to regulate their emotions, these processes are linked with evolutionarily older mechanisms that are common across species.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/121148.php

Meat may prevent memory loss
meatinfo.co.uk - Crawley,England,UK
A vitamin found in meat can help prevent brain shrinkage and protect against memory loss in old age, a new study has found. In a study conducted by the ...
http://www.meatinfo.co.uk/articles/66570/Meat-may-prevent-memory-loss.aspx?categoryid=9045

Varied aspects of research revelations - VI
Merinews - New Delhi,India
... slows down their brain shrinkage and helps in fighting memory loss among them. It has been found that the elderly with lower than average vitamin B12 ...
http://www.merinews.com/catFull.jsp?title=Varied%20aspects%20of%20research%20revelations%20-%20VI&articleID=140993

High Levels of Vitamin B12 in Elders Reduce Risk of Brain Shrinkage

http://www.docguide.com/gpc.nsf/doc?CreateDocument&n=22&id=66B03AF3258F523F85256FAA0021D865&t=00-00-00;AM&l=email-09-11-2008w&u=/redirect.nsf/we_link?OpenForm&id=66B03AF3258F523F85256FAA0021D865&ntype=int&newsid=852571020057CCF6852574BF0064DB78

Combination Treatment for Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Induces Remission, Prevents Progression

http://www.docguide.com/gpc.nsf/doc?CreateDocument&n=22&id=66B03AF3258F523F85256FAA0021D865&t=00-00-00;AM&l=email-09-11-2008w&u=/redirect.nsf/we_link?OpenForm&id=66B03AF3258F523F85256FAA0021D865&ntype=int&newsid=852571020057CCF68525748700648D1B

Combination Drug Taken Early Relieves Migraine Symptoms (DGNews)

http://www.docguide.com/gpc.nsf/doc?CreateDocument&n=22&id=66B03AF3258F523F85256FAA0021D865&t=00-00-00;AM&l=email-09-11-2008w&u=/redirect.nsf/we_link?OpenForm&id=66B03AF3258F523F85256FAA0021D865&ntype=int&newsid=852571020057CCF68525747F004CB316


NJ, PA hospital mistakes not being reported

http://www.uptilt.com/c.html?rtr=on&s=69l,11xk7,osy,7lih,8pkj,5ewk,1y5l

 By Anne Zieger
While hospitals in Pennsylvania and New Jersey are supposed to be reporting serious mistakes, it appears that too often, they aren't doing so. That, at least, is the conclusion drawn by observers in those states who argue that the hospitals' failure to comply with regs is compromising ongoing efforts to boost patient safety. In theory, hospitals in both states have been required to report mistakes and complications to state monitoring agencies for a number of years. But in practice, it doesn't always happen.

For example, researchers found several major errors and complications at hospitals in Pennsylvania last year, none of which had been reported to the Pennsylvania Department of Health. In New Jersey, five of the state's 80 hospitals didn't report any preventable mistakes at all last year, and in Pennsylvania, some facilities didn't report any serious mistakes or even near misses. While good safety records are admirable, it's unlikely that these facilities had absolutely perfect records, which suggests that something is wrong, observers say.

Such reporting gaps, in part, can be solved by training more staff members and working to improve treatment, according to hospital associations in both states. However, reporting gaps like these also suggest that it may be quite some time before the large number of states requiring such reporting--a total of 26 at present--can actually have a shot at making the impact they'd hoped to make. (Whether such reporting can really help hospitals make appropriate changes in the first place, of course, is a discussion all its own.)
To learn more about this issue:
- read this Philadelphia Inquirer piece
http://www.uptilt.com/c.html?rtr=on&s=69l,11xk7,osy,61v9,6u7c,5ewk,1y5l

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