Monday, August 18, 2008

Recruiting FTY720 in Patients With Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis - Pro: Marijuana use for chronic pain and nausea

Recruiting           FTY720 in Patients With Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis
Efficacy and Safety of Fingolimod (FTY720) in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00731692?term=fingolimod&rank=5


FTY720 fingolimod Novartis

Multiple Sclerosis Resource Centre FTY720 (Fingolimod)
Novartis said the most frequently reported side effects in patients treated with FTY720, or fingolimod, for up to 18 months were infections such as colds, ...

Laquinimod

Patients sought for study of new MS drug
Tucson Citizen - Tucson,AZ,USA
The two-year study is testing the efficacy of the drug laquinimod, the first pill developed for MS patients. "The medications that are available and the ...
See all stories on this topic

A young mother draws strength from her struggles with MS

By Kimberly Zolotar

After 13 years of the illness, she maintains a positive outlook while adapting to a body that no longer cooperates. >>

A young mother draws strength from her struggles with MS

After 13 years of the illness, she maintains a positive outlook while adapting to a body that no longer cooperates.

By Kimberly Zolotar, Special to The Times
August 18, 2008

AFRIEND recently asked me what it felt like to have multiple sclerosis. We were sitting at the park watching our kids play, and we would have looked like any other suburban moms except for my silver walker covered with Spider-man stickers stationed nearby.
I did not immediately answer her question. How could I possibly explain how it feels to have a potentially disabling, progressive and incurable neurological disease? It has been 13 years since my doctor told me I have MS, but the answer to my friend's question changes every day, sometimes every hour.

My MS experience reminds me of that famous line from the movie "Forrest Gump": "Life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get." To me, having MS is like being forced to eat chocolates from a box that had all the good chocolates removed. Every chocolate I eat from the MS box is something I do not like, just like every MS symptom has the power to annoy me and sometimes even scare me.
Having MS means that I never know how I am going to feel when I wake up each morning. I have to plan around the whims of a body that no longer cooperates. The covering around the nerves of my brain and spinal cord is being slowly eaten away by my own cells, resulting in legs that no longer guide me effortlessly throughout the day. My legs are too weak for the long walks on the beach that I once enjoyed.
Having MS means I might wake up to a numb hand, an aching back or legs saddled by weakness, stiffness or fatigue. Mornings can start out with a big yawn because I was up four times the night before to use the bathroom; my stomach and ribs might ache because it feels as if a boa constrictor has been squeezing them. Most of these problems go away without treatment, but sometimes I will need a few days of intravenous steroids to help speed my recovery.

Having MS has taught me a lot about myself. I now know that I can be tough when the need arises, and that I should not worry about the future. Each day is a chance to feel stronger. Through my daily struggles with this disease, I am trying to show my son that the obstacles I face are not stopping me from living life.
Being diagnosed with MS when my adult life was just starting was a sad thing, but I am not a sad person. I am genuinely happy when I watch my little boy hit a baseball, when I have a "date night" with my husband or when a child I am working with begins reading. MS is powerful, but it cannot take these moments away from me.
Kimberly Zolotar is a wife, mother and legal secretary living in Rancho Cucamonga.

http://link.latimes.com/r/P7B0FH/GY5QI/HJYZ37/1A6O/1RDRC/HK/h


Found 21 studies with search of:  
fingolimod

Hide studies that are not seeking new volunteers.



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1
Recruiting
Efficacy and Safety of Fingolimod (FTY720) in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

Condition:
Multiple Sclerosis

Interventions:
Drug: Fingolimod;   Drug: Fingolimod;   Drug: Fingolimod matching placebo

2
Active, not recruiting
Efficacy and Safety of Fingolimod in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis With Optional Extension Phase

Condition:
Multiple Sclerosis

Interventions:
Drug: Fingolimod;   Drug: Fingolimod;   Drug: Interferon beta-1a

3
Active, not recruiting
Efficacy and Safety of Fingolimod in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

Condition:
Multiple Sclerosis

Interventions:
Drug: Fingolimod;   Drug: Fingolimod;   Drug: Fingolimod matching placbeo

4
Enrolling by invitation
Long Term Efficacy and Safety of FTY720 in Patients With Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

Condition:
Multiple Sclerosis

Interventions:
Drug: Fingolimod (FTY720);   Drug: Fingolimod (FTY720)

5
Recruiting
FTY720 in Patients With Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

Condition:
Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

Interventions:
Drug: Capsules of Placebo;   Drug: FTY720D 1.25mg

6
Enrolling by invitation
An Extension Study of Efficacy and Safety of FTY720 in Patients With Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

Condition:
Multiple Sclerosis

Intervention:
Drug: FTY720

7
Recruiting
Pharmacokinetics (PK) and Metabolism of FTY720 in Patients With Severe Renal Impairment and Healthy Matched Subjects.

Condition:
Renal Insufficiency

Intervention:
Drug: fingolimod (FTY720)

8
Active, not recruiting
Extension Study to Evaluate Safety, Tolerability and Effects on Efficacy Parameters of FTY720 in Patients With Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis.

Condition:
Multiple Sclerosis

Intervention:
Drug: Fingolimod

9
Recruiting
Efficacy and Safety of FTY720 in Patients With Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Condition:
Multiple Sclerosis

Intervention:
Drug: FTY720

10
Completed
Efficacy and Safety of FTY720 in Patients With Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

Condition:
Multiple Sclerosis

Intervention:
Drug: FTY720

11
Completed
Efficacy and Safety of FTY720 in De Novo Adult Renal Transplant Recipients

Condition:
Renal Transplantation

Intervention:
Drug: FTY720

http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=fingolimod+
MRI in Differential Diagnosis of MS
In this case-based CME/CE newsletter, Dr. Tracy DeAngelis seeks an accurate diagnosis for a patient whose MRI suggests chronic demyelinating disease by applying updated McDonald Criteria and performing additional workups to rule out other potential causes of the MRI abnormalities.
Source:
Projects In Knowledge [more]


Symptoms and Management

Dr. Bar-Or

MS neurologist and researcher, Montreal Neurological Institute, QC
View BIO


Q :
I have relapsing-remitting MS and was diagnosed in 1993. For about a week before my last exacerbation I had a splitting headache. I took pain relievers but then my head just felt like it went numb. I was just wondering if this is something that is associated with MS. My doctor put me on a course of steroids and that seemed to help and the pain went away. I'm having the same symptoms again and would appreciate your input.
A :
Overall, studies to date have not shown a strong relationship between MS and headaches, though some studies have suggested that MS patients experience more headaches on the average than people who do not have MS. Of course, headaches are very common, and so it is not surprising that people with MS may commonly experience headaches. Further, since most types of headaches are made worse by different stressors (and people with MS may certainly have their added share of stressors) headaches may be more common with MS more because of the overall experience of having MS, rather than a direct effect of MS. In other words, it is very uncommon for MS lesions in the brain to directly cause headaches. There are a few exceptions such as Trigeminal neuralgia, or optic neuritis, where the location of the lesion itself may trigger headaches. If someone with MS has a predisposition for headaches, they may well experience their headache around the time of an attack (which can also be a particularly stressful time). In someone with MS who does not have a predisposition for headaches, the appearance of a bad headache should not immediately be assumed to be due to MS and it is prudent to see the care team and consider other causes. For the typical headaches that someone with or without MS may experience (migraines, tension headaches, cluster headaches) - there is no reason to think that the treatment would be different for those with MS versus those without.
I am also attaching what I think is a nice summary to the question - 'Does Multiple Sclerosis Cause Headache?' as presented recently by Dr. Rohit Bakshi:, and I would agree with his recommendations.
"Rarely, headaches can be directly caused by MS lesions, such as large, supratentorial, tumorlike plaques or lesions in the pons. However, in most cases, the headaches are present without predictable MRI correlations. Patients with MS may also develop headaches during bouts of optic neuritis. These are typically unilateral and worsened by eye movement. Other causes for headaches in MS patients are cervical paraspinal spasm (tension headache), migraine, or depression. There is no evidence indicating that headaches in patients with MS require treatment different from that for similar headache syndromes not associated with MS. In my experience, most patients respond to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents or antidepressants and migraine-specific agents, if indicated. In selected cases, referral to a pain specialist may be helpful."
Suggested Readings
Bakshi R, Glass J, Louis DN, Hochberg FH. Magnetic resonance imaging features of solitary inflammatory brain masses. J Neuroimaging. 1998;8:8-14.
Kramer R. Treatment of chronic pain. In: Rudick RA, Goodkin DE, eds. Multiple Sclerosis Therapeutics. London: Martin Dunitz; 1999:541-546.
Matthews WB, Compston A, Allen IV, Martyn CN. McAlpine's Multiple Sclerosis. New York: Churchill Livingstone; 1992:71.
Paty DW, Ebers GC. Clinical features. In: Paty DW, Ebers GC, eds. Multiple Sclerosis. Philadelphia: FA Davis; 1998:135-191.
Rolak LA, Brown S. Headaches and multiple sclerosis: a clinical study and review of the literature. J Neurol. 1990;237:300-302.
8/18/2008 5:51:11 PM
More answers from Dr. Amit Bar-Or
More answers in the category: Symptoms and Management
http://www.msanswers.ca/QuestionView.aspx?L=2&QID=414


Pro: Marijuana use for chronic pain and nausea

Pro: Marijuana use for chronic pain and nausea

By Jill U. Adams

Smoked marijuana can bring relief to sufferers of neuropathic pain comparable to that of other painkiller drugs, some studies show. >>

URMC And NIH Partner To Expand, Accelerate Clinical Research In Neurological Diseases
The University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke are hosting a week-long training session designed to create a new generation of researchers with the specialized skills necessary to conduct clinical trials in neurological disorders.

Tysabri

Beacon Equity Issues Technical Trade Alerts on Biotechnology
TransWorldNews (press release) - Monroe,GA,USA
The split has recently gained importance following renewed safety concerns over multiple sclerosis drug Tysabri and disappointment with tests of an ...
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Europe assessing Tysabri brain disease reports
Pharma Times (subscription) - London,UK
The two cases reported at the end of July occurred in patients who had been receiving Tysabri for more than 12 months, but renewed old fears for investors ...
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Drug stocks mixed; Elan continues rebound
MarketWatch - USA
Tysabri was pulled off the market for about a year in 2005 after three cases of PML were identified. Two of those patients subsequently died. ...
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41 Stocks Returning 10% or More Last Week
Seeking Alpha - New York,NY,USA
... then more bad results from its multiple sclerosis drug Tysabri; the same thing happened a few years ago with Tysabri and Elan was similarly punished. ...
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Lower Sales of Tysabri Predicted
From The Boston Globe - Aug 06, 2008
Financial analysts are predicting the number of patients using Tysabri will fall far below Biogen Idec Inc.'s forecast, following the Cambridge biotech company's disclosure last week that two more patients using the multiple sclerosis drug contracted a potentially fatal brain disease.
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Bacteria played a role in 1918 pandemic flu deaths, scientists say

Bacteria played a role in 1918 pandemic flu deaths, scientists say

By Mary Engel

The virus triggered a violent immune response that injured the lungs, making them a target for bacterial infection, two studies say. The findings may guide preparations for future outbreaks. >>

Pill Taken Before Sex Would Prevent Transmission of HIV
From The Independent (UK) - Aug 06, 2008
Scientists are developing a pill to be taken before sex that would stop transmission of HIV. In the latest development in the battle against the global epidemic which claimed two million lives last year, researchers are investigating whether drugs used to treat the disease might be harnessed to protect against it.
Read Full Article Article Summary

 

Use it or lose it: Yes, it's true

By Regina Nuzzo

Urology clinics have a saying: "Erections make erections." >>

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