Thursday, April 03, 2008

Why We Don't Always Learn From Our Mistakes

Why We Don't Always Learn From Our Mistakes
If you are struggling to retrieve a word that you are certain is on the tip of your tongue, or trying to perfect a slapshot that will send your puck flying into a hockey net, or if you keep stumbling over the same sequence of notes on the piano, be warned: you might be unconsciously creating a pattern of failure, a new study reveals.


MRI Images Of Genes In Action In The Living Brain Published By Harvard Researchers
Biologists have just confirmed what poets have known for centuries: eyes really are windows of the soul - or at least of the brain. In a new study published in the April 2008 print issue of The FASEB Journal (01 Apr 2008


Pot Belly Linked To Dementia"A pot belly in middle age dramatically raises the risk of Alzheimer's", reports the Daily Mail. Men and women who have "large stomachs in their 40s are three times more likely to suffer serious mental decline when they reached their 70s", the newspaper adds.


Left/Right Differences In How Brains Are Wired
It's well known that the left and right sides of the brain differ in many animal species and this is thought to influence cognitive performance and social behaviour. For instance, in humans, the left half of the brain is concerned with language processing whereas the right side is better at comprehending musical melody.


Brain Lesions More Common Than Previously Thought
New research shows cerebral microbleeds, which are lesions in the brain, are more common in people over 60 than previously thought. The study is published in the April 1, 2008, issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.


A Gene Responsible For Cases Of Lou Gehrig's Disease Identified By Researchers
A team of Canadian and French researchers has identified a novel gene responsible for a significant fraction of ALS (sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) cases. ALS is commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, an incurable neuromuscular disorder that affects motor neurons and leads to paralysis and death within one to five years.


MS patients get $37000 medicine relief
Sydney Morning Herald - Sydney,New South Wales,Australia
The subsidies for Tysabri to treat multiple sclerosis and Sensipar to treat renal disease will cost taxpayers $535 million. A subsidy for a third expensive ...
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Guilty plea plan seems fair
Daily Telegraph - Sydney,New South Wales,Australia
The subsidies, to apply from July 1, will cut the price of MS medicine Tysabri from $37000 a year to $31.30 a month. Tysabri helps reduce the number of ...
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Relief at last for patients on $37000 MS drug
Daily Telegraph - Sydney,New South Wales,Australia
But multiple sclerosis sufferer Sharon Eacott described the Government's decision to give Ritalin priority over the MS medicine Tysabri as a "kick in the ...
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MediciNova to Present Additional Clinical Data Demonstrating ...
Primenewswire (press release) - Los Angeles,CA,USA
The new data shows that MN-166 significantly decreased the progression of new inflammatory lesions to persistent black holes (permanent brain lesions ...
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Unraveling How A Drug Helps Patients With Multiple Sclerosis
Medical News Today Wed, 02 Apr 2008 5:02 AM PDT
Although the drug IFN-beta is commonly used to treat individuals with the relapsing-remitting form of multiple sclerosis (MS), little is known about the mechanism(s) by which it acts. However, Genhong Cheng and colleagues, at the University of California at Los Angeles, have now reported a mechanistic pathway by which it reduces disease in a mouse model of MS known as EAE.


Journal Of Clinical Investigation Online Early Table Of Contents: April 1, 2008
Medical News Today Wed, 02 Apr 2008 4:17 AM PDT
Unraveling how a drug helps patients with multiple sclerosisAlthough the drug IFN-beta is commonly used to treat individuals with the relapsing-remitting form of multiple sclerosis (MS), little is known about the mechanism(s) by which it acts.

No MS problem in Hobart ABC
Australian Broadcasting Corporation Tue, 01 Apr 2008 10:11 PM PDT
The ABC's Hobart broadcast centre has been cleared of any links with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Witness says men came to Michigan to kill couple
C&G Newspapers - Detroit,MI,USA
Oakland County Assistant Prosecutor Ken Frazee said that Aasha Chhabra suffered from multiple sclerosis, a neurological disorder. ...
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MRI Images Of Genes In Action In The Living Brain Published By Harvard Researchers
Biologists have just confirmed what poets have known for centuries: eyes really are windows of the soul - or at least of the brain. In a new study published in the April 2008 print issue of The FASEB Journal (01 Apr 2008
Unraveling How A Drug Helps Patients With Multiple Sclerosis
Although the drug IFN-beta is commonly used to treat individuals with the relapsing-remitting form of multiple sclerosis (MS), little is known about the mechanism(s) by which it acts. However, Genhong Cheng and colleagues, at the University of California at Los Angeles, have now reported a mechanistic pathway by which it reduces disease in a mouse model of MS known as EAE.

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