Wednesday, January 02, 2008

Nature Could Provide Cures For Autoimmune Diseases


Health News Story - WFTV Orlando

Multiple sclerosis, juvenile diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis affect millions of Americans, yet doctors still aren't sure what causes autoimmune diseases. But researchers are hopeful nature could provide some help.After 26-years with diabetes, Suzy Won Davidson knows the drill. And at 36, year's-old, she's no longer the child who once dreamed of a cure."'We'll find a cure,'" she said. "'About five years. Give us five years.' So every five years another five years would go by and I'd say, 'Wow. There's not a cure yet.'"Not yet, but Suzy finds renewed hope in a lab at University of California, Irvine.


READ: Natural Treatments For Autoimmune Disorders



In tests on human blood cells, researchers blocked destructive cells responsible for juvenile diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis, actually stopping the diseases in rats. Their weapons are modified compounds from sea anemone venom and a compound from this shrub. "At this stage we don't know if it'll be a long term treatment or if treatment for a period of time will completely suppress the disease and prevent it from coming back," said Dr. Christine Beeton, a physiology researcher.

In autoimmune diseases, the immune system attacks the body's own tissue. The attacking cells need ion channels to function. But using compounds from a rue plant and a sea anemone, researchers blocked those channels without blocking cells needed to fight infection."It gives us more clues. It's sort of like putting a jigsaw puzzle together where the more pieces you can fill in, the easier it is to fill in the rest of the puzzle," said Suzie.Now that researchers have proven the compounds work in-vitro on human cells and in animal tests, they hope to begin testing in humans in the next few years.
http://www.wftv.com/health/14960393/detail.html?rss=orlc&psp=health


Nature Could Provide Cures For Autoimmune Diseases
WFTV 9 Orlando Wed, 02 Jan 2008 11:14 AM PST
Multiple sclerosis, juvenile diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis affect millions of Americans, yet doctors still aren't sure what causes autoimmune diseases. But researchers are hopeful nature could provide some help. READ: Natural Treatments For Autoimmune Disorders WATCH:
Nutra Pharma Expands Licensing Agreement To Include Environmental Testing For Nontuberculous Mycobacterium
DrugDiscoveryOnline Tue, 01 Jan 2008 0:41 AM PST
Nutra Pharma Corp. a biotechnology company that is developing drugs for HIV and Multiple Sclerosis (MS), has recently announced that it has expanded its licensing agreement with NanoLogix, Inc., to include intellectual property for the use of testing the environment for NonTuberculous Mycobacterium (NTM).

Omega-3s linked to prevention of Parkinson's disease and more
NEWSFOOD.com Primo piano - Alessandria,Piemonte,Italy
... a hallmark of the disease DENVER, Dec 26 /PRNewswire/ -- A milestone report links long-chain (marine) omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with ...
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Reporters Say Were Threatened by Montel
The Associated Press -
Williams, a patient advocate since being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, later issued a statement apologizing for the outburst. "I mistakenly thought the ...
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Media scan
Indianapolis Star - United States
Williams, who has multiple sclerosis, talks about his struggle and how he focuses on raw, whole and blended fruits and vegetables, while slashing processed ...
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Reporters Say Were Threatened by Montel
The Associated Press -
Williams, a patient advocate since being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, later issued a statement apologizing for the outburst. "I mistakenly thought the ...
See all stories on this topic

Reporters Say Were Threatened by Montel
The Associated Press -
Williams, a patient advocate since being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, later issued a statement apologizing for the outburst. "I mistakenly thought the ...
See all stories on this topic

Atomic Structure Of Proteins Altered In Autism
A new study by an international group of scientists describes in atomic detail a protein complex that is affected by genetic mutations implicated in autism spectrum disorders. The research team, including scientists from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (SSPPS), details the neuroligin family of proteins, which are encoded by genes known to be mutated in certain patients with autism.01 Jan 2008

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