Wednesday, December 12, 2007

Xanthus' Symadex Demonstrates Ability to Increase Spinal Cord ...

Xanthus' Symadex Demonstrates Ability to Increase Spinal Cord ...
PR-Inside.com (Pressemitteilung) - Wien,Austria
Of significant note, Symadex also increased spinal cord remyelination (the repair of damaged myelin) in the study. Myelin repair occurs spontaneously in MS, ...
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bioms Medical's phase III US multiple sclerosis trial receives ...
Earthtimes - London,UK
The primary clinical endpoint for the trial is defined as a statistically and clinically significant increase in the time to progression of the disease as ...
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tidalwave Executes Asset Purchase Deal To Acquire Two FCC Licensed ...
RTT News - Williamsville,NY,USA
... MAESTRO-03 US pivotal phase III clinical trial of MBP8298 for the treatment of secondary progressive MS and recommended that the trial continue. ...
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Xanthus' Symadex Demonstrates Ability to Increase Spinal Cord Remyelination in Multiple Sclerosis Model

http://www.pr-inside.com/xanthus-symadex-demonstrates-ability-to-r342953.htm

© Business Wire 2007

2007-12-11 18:29:31 -

www.xanthus.com - MacDougall Biomedical Communications, Inc. Sarah Cavanaugh, 508-647-0209 scavanaugh@macbiocom.com or Xanthus Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Lisa Terry, 617-225-0522, x 105 lisa.terry@xanthus.com Xanthus Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today presented preclinical data further supporting the potential for Symadex(TM) to reverse the clinical and pathological signs of multiple sclerosis (MS), including new data demonstrating increased spinal cord remyelination. The study was presented by Dr. Stephen J. Karlik, Ph.D., Professor of Diagnostic Radiology at the University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario and researchers from Xanthus at a meeting of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada in Banff, Canada.

Using an animal model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelistis (EAE) designed to replicate MS, Dr. Karlik studied the efficacy of Symadex in both acute and chronic phases of the disease. While treatment with Symadex in this study attenuated acute EAE, it prevented chronic disease. Importantly, in chronic disease Symadex also demonstrated a statistically significant ability to reverse clinical signs of EAE, including perivascular inflammation, myelitis (inflammation of the spinal cord resulting in a loss of its ability to transmit nerve impulses) and demyelination (the loss of myelin, a protective coating of the nerve fibers, that can lead to impaired bodily functions).
Of significant note, Symadex also increased spinal cord remyelination (the repair of damaged myelin) in the study. Myelin repair occurs spontaneously in MS, but happens very slowly. Identifying ways to speed the healing process is an important component in finding an effective treatment for MS. In the study, remyelination was determined after four weeks of treatment by a blinded observer who measured the size of all lesions and the amount remyelinated in all sections of the animal.
The study also builds on prior data demonstrating Symadex's novel mechanism of action, which is believed to directly target macrophages and monocytes, key cells responsible for driving the autoimmune response.
"This study adds to the growing body of work supporting the ability of Symadex to prevent and reverse chronic disease in the animal model of multiple sclerosis," said Dr. Karlick. "The newly observed evidence of remyelination is noteworthy and warrants additional study."
"Repeated studies of Symadex continue to support the promise of the candidate," said Richard T. Dean, Ph.D, Xanthus's Chief Executive Officer. "We remain on track to initiate a human proof-of-concept study in autoimmune disease in 2008 and believe the data on remyelination enhances the partnering opportunities for Symadex(TM)."
About Symadex(TM)
Symadex (formerly C-1311) is the lead compound in clinical development from a new series of agents, the imidazoacridinones, which have shown in vitro to be potent and selective FLT3 receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Symadex is currently in a Phase 2 study for women with metastatic breast cancer, and has the potential to be active in hematological malignancies. Xanthus is also exploring the use of Symadex and follow-on compounds for the treatment of a number of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and inflammatory bowel disease. Early preclinical data has shown encouraging signs of activity in models of autoimmune disease. Given the compound's safety profile and oral availability, Xanthus believes Symadex represents an exciting drug opportunity. Further preclinical studies are currently being conducted, after which the Company expects to enter clinical development.
About Xanthus Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Xanthus Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is developing a portfolio of novel, clinical-stage, small-molecule therapeutic candidates through a management team whose accomplished track record encompasses all aspects of drug development, from discovery through regulatory approval and commercialization. The Company is applying its expertise to advance its current pipeline to address significant unmet medical need in oncology and autoimmune diseases. Xanthus is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts with an additional facility in Montreal, Quebec. More information is available at www.xanthus.com.
This press release contains forward-looking statements concerning Xanthus that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. For this purpose, any statements contained herein that are not statements of historical fact may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Without limiting the foregoing, the words, "believes," "anticipates," "plans," "expects," "estimates," "intends," "should," "could," "will," "may," and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. There are a number of important factors that could cause Xanthus' actual results to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements, including risks as to whether results obtained in early clinical studies or in preclinical studies such as the studies referred to above will be indicative of results obtained in future clinical trials or warrant additional trials; whether products based on Xanthus' technology will advance through the clinical trial process and receive approval from the United States Food and Drug Administration or equivalent foreign regulatory agencies; whether the company will have the cash resources to develop and commercialize its products; and whether the patent and patent applications owned or licensed by Xanthus will protect the Company's technology and prevent others from infringing it. Xanthus disclaims any intention or obligation to update any forward-looking statements.
Preclinical data presented at a meeting of the Multiple Sclerosis
Society of Canada
http://www.pr-inside.com/xanthus-symadex-demonstrates-ability-to-r342953.htm
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Stem Cell Therapeutics Corp. Supports the Canadian endms Research ...
Market Wire (press release) - USA
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Doxycycline added to interferon beta-1a may send MS into remission
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Seacoastonline.com: Poetry to cybercrime subjects of York library writer's night
Laurie Simpson grew up in Cleveland, Ohio, went to school in Colorado, then moved to Washington, D.C. In l984, she was working in Micronesia when she was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. She was 27.

Since then, she has moved to Maine, married Chris Simpson, come to work for the Maine Attorney General's office, and gotten a terrific service dog named Keebler. Today Simpson uses an iBot wheelchair that climbs stairs, likes to adopt old dogs from shelters, and is trying to learn Spanish. She writes a bi-weekly column about her MS for the Lincoln County News called "My Friend the Enemy."

http://www.seacoastonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071212/LIFE/712120325

Multiple Sclerosis Progress May Be Slowed With Antibiotics
Using antibiotics along with other commonly used drugs to treat multiple sclerosis (MS) could slow down the progress of the disease, according to a report published in Archives of Neurology (JAMA/Archives).

Gene Plays Protective Role In MS, UK
New research announced this week has found an association between certain genes and the severity of multiple sclerosis (MS). The results of the study by Prof George Ebers, chair of Clinical Neurology at the 11 Dec 2007

Sainsbury Trust Funds "Vital" MS Research, UK
A study funded by the MS Society that examines the use of a chemical compound of the cannabis plant in people with multiple sclerosis (MS) has received a donation of £120,000 from the Sainsbury Family Charitable Trusts.

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